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An Essay on Man: Epistle I

An Essay on Man, Epistle I Lyrics

❶He learned several languages on his own, and his early verses were often imitations of poets he admired.

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Shall he alone, whom rational we call, Be pleas'd with nothing, if not bless'd with all? The bliss of Man could Pride that blessing find Is not to act or think beyond mankind; No pow'rs of body or of soul to share, But what his nature and his state can bear. Why has not Man a microscopic eye? For this plain reason, Man is not a Fly. Say what the use, were finer optics giv'n, T' inspect a mite, not comprehend the heav'n? Or touch, if tremblingly alive all o'er, To smart and agonize at every pore?

Or quick effluvia darting thro' the brain, Die of a rose in aromatic pain? If Nature thunder'd in his op'ning ears, And stunn'd him with the music of the spheres, How would he wish that Heav'n had left him still The whisp'ring Zephyr, and the purling rill? Who finds not Providence all good and wise, Alike in what it gives, and what denies? Mark how it mounts, to Man's imperial race, From the green myriads in the peopled grass: What modes of sight betwixt each wide extreme, The mole's dim curtain, and the lynx's beam: Of smell, the headlong lioness between, And hound sagacious on the tainted green: Of hearing, from the life that fills the Flood, To that which warbles thro' the vernal wood: The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine!

Feels at each thread, and lives along the line: In the nice bee, what sense so subtly true From pois'nous herbs extracts the healing dew? How Instinct varies in the grov'lling swine, Compar'd, half-reas'ning elephant, with thine!

Remembrance and Reflection how ally'd; What thin partitions Sense from Thought divide: And Middle natures, how they long to join, Yet never pass th' insuperable line! Without this just gradation, could they be Subjected, these to those, or all to thee? The pow'rs of all subdu'd by thee alone, Is not thy Reason all these pow'rs in one? Above, how high, progressive life may go! Vast chain of Being!

Or in the full creation leave a void, Where, one step broken, the great scale's destroy'd: From Nature's chain whatever link you strike, Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. And, if each system in gradation roll Alike essential to th' amazing Whole, The least confusion but in one, not all That system only, but the Whole must fall. Let Earth unbalanc'd from her orbit fly, Planets and Suns run lawless thro' the sky; Let ruling Angels from their spheres be hurl'd, Being on Being wreck'd, and world on world; Heav'n's whole foundations to their centre nod, And Nature tremble to the throne of God.

All this dread Order break — for whom? IX What if the foot, ordain'd the dust to tread, Or hand, to toil, aspir'd to be the head? What if the head, the eye, or ear repin'd To serve mere engines to the ruling Mind? Just as absurd for any part to claim To be another, in this gen'ral frame: Just as absurd, to mourn the tasks or pains, The great directing Mind of All ordains.

All are but parts of one stupendous whole, Whose body Nature is, and God the soul; That, chang'd thro' all, and yet in all the same; Great in the earth, as in th' ethereal frame; Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees, Lives thro' all life, extends thro' all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart: As full, as perfect, in vile Man that mourns, As the rapt Seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.

And stunn'd him with the music of the spheres,. How would he wish that Heav'n had left him still. The whisp'ring zephyr, and the purling rill? The scale of sensual, mental pow'rs ascends: From the green myriads in the peopled grass: What modes of sight betwixt each wide extreme,.

The mole's dim curtain, and the lynx's beam: Of hearing, from the life that fills the flood,. To that which warbles through the vernal wood: Feels at each thread, and lives along the line: From pois'nous herbs extracts the healing dew: How instinct varies in the grov'lling swine,.

Compar'd, half-reas'ning elephant, with thine: What thin partitions sense from thought divide: See, through this air, this ocean, and this earth,. Beast, bird, fish, insect! Where, one step broken, the great scale's destroy'd: From nature's chain whatever link you strike,. Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike. Planets and suns run lawless through the sky;.

Let ruling angels from their spheres be hurl'd,. Heav'n's whole foundations to their centre nod,. All this dread order break—for whom? What if the foot ordain'd the dust to tread,. Just as absurd, to mourn the tasks or pains,. All are but parts of one stupendous whole,. That, chang'd through all, and yet in all the same,. Great in the earth, as in th' ethereal frame,. Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees,. Lives through all life, extends through all extent,.

Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part,. As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns,. He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all. Cease then, nor order imperfection name: Know thy own point: This kind, this due degree.

Of blindness, weakness, Heav'n bestows on thee. All chance, direction, which thou canst not see;. And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite,. More Poems by Alexander Pope.

Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. Epistles to Several Persons: To a Lady on the Characters of Women. It's quite likely to come up as an essay topic, and if you have to write an analysis of it your first question will probably be where to start.

That really depends on what your exact task is; if you have to look at one aspect of the poem - its imagery, for example - your research will be quite different to that for a general analysis. Here are some ideas for an analysis essay on this poem. The poem is extremely long and is broken into four epistles - letters - each of which is intended to explore a different aspect of human nature. Within each epistle the structure is simple; it is written in couplets, where every group of two lines rhyme and have the same meter.

Rhyme and meter frequently change quite a lot between successive line pairs, however. The overarching theme of the poem is human nature, but this is broken down into many smaller themes.

In fact each epistle is prefaced by a summary, around words log, of the themes it covers. It is quite impossible to examine each theme individually without writing a fairly long book; for an essay it's best to stick with the group of themes represented by each epistle. These are as follows:.

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Complete summary of Alexander Pope's An Essay on Man. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of An Essay on Man.

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An Essay on Man consists of four epistles, which is a term that is historically used to describe formal letters directed to a specific person. The first epistle looks at man's relation to the.

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Critical Essays Alexander Pope's Essay on Man Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List The work that more than any other popularized the optimistic philosophy, not only in England but throughout Europe, was Alexander Pope's Essay on Man (), a rationalistic effort to justify the ways of God to man philosophically. Summary. The subtitle of the first epistle is “Of the Nature and State of Man, with Respect to the Universe,” and this section deals with man’s place in the cosmos.

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These later poems are more severe in their moral judgments and more acid in their satire: Pope’s Essay on Man is a philosophical poem on metaphysics, ethics, and The Rape of the Lock Study Guide - Context. Essay on man sparknotes Best powerpoint presentations on early man Between the man s to the epistle s there was a utterance of education of rights in the permission review brought on by a sensation of first hunter-gatherers.